MURI

MURI Publications |  MURI Overview (pdf)

MURI is a multi-agency program overseen by the Department of Defense comprising three awarding offices: the Army Research Office (ARO), the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). The purpose of the program is to support multidisciplinary research projects at U.S. universities that have potential both for defense and for commercial applications.

Professor Pamela Norris leads a team of researchers who were awarded funding from the highly competitive federal 2007 Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) Program. The award is $7.5M over five years. Norris heads the multi-disciplinary, multi-university team with members from Arizona State, the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Illinois, and Rensselaer Polytechnic University.

System-Level Approach for Multi-Phase, Nanotechnology-Enhanced Cooling
of High-Power Microelectronic Systems

Click the image above to see an overview of the MURI program with progress to date.

The objective of the project, “System-Level Approach for Multi-Phase, Nanotechnology-Enhanced Cooling of High-Power Microelectronic Systems,” is to develop a robust, low-temperature thermal management approach for distributed, large-scale, high-power electronic systems using improved heat transfer technologies and system modeling/control concepts to reduce the total system thermal resistance so that chip and device temperatures are maintained below 65°C.

The team has developed an integrated approach to reduce chip temperatures in large-scale and high heat flux, complex electronic systems using microfabrication, nanotechnology, and modern systems control strategies that are being applied for the first time to heat conduction and multi-phase heat transfer problems. Work focuses on reducing the four primary resistances—at solid/solid interfaces and three solid/fluid interfaces—in the overall system thermal circuit through a combination of fundamental advances in thermal bonding technologies and enhanced boiling and condensation heat transfer at the nano and microscale in controlled refrigeration systems.

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“We’re breaking new ground,” Norris says. “Our task is to explore new ways to cool entire ship-wide systems that are unprecedented in their size and complexity, yet composed of millions of individual elements whose features can be measured in microns.  A further requirement is that these solutions, on the macro and micro scale, have to be integrated.”  These new approaches will require fundamental advances in the thermal regulation of electronic systems.  More at UVa Today SEAS MURI Award Paves Way for All-Electronic Navy
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